An “easy 30km run”

trail running

 

An “easy 30km run”

You know you’re around a special group of people when they discuss going for an ‘easy 30km run’ on their low intensity training day. This is the type of people you’ll find at an ultra marathon running seminar. These special individuals cover a marathon without thinking twice, and their goal distances are in triple figures!

Andy Dubois is an Adelaide born personal trainer with a difference. He is an elite endurance athlete who completed numerous Ironman events before transitioning into the world of ultra marathon running. By definition, an ultra marathon is any foot race beyond the traditional marathon race distance of 42.2km (26.2 miles). He is coach to many elite and recreational athletes around the world, and is an expert in ultra marathon running. I had the opportunity to learn from this passionate athlete when he was back visiting Adelaide over the weekend.        http://www.mile27.com.au

 

The top 5 points that I picked up from Andy:

1) As a runner, you must do running specific movement (stretching and strengthening) to ensure the most cross over into your running. Don’t bother with planks to improve your core strength in running!

2) When training for an event, do training that is relevant to that event. This applies in short and long distance running, as well as most sports and activities. If the event involves hill running, make sure your training involves similar hills.

3) The longer the race, the more chance of things going wrong. Beyond the distance of the marathon, the chance of problems developing mid-race increases significantly. Bad weather, cramp, hydration and nutrition can cause the end of your event if you don’t have a plan to survive these situations.

4) Mental toughness should be part of your training. Just like you train your legs to run, training your mental toughness to face challenging situations can be a huge part of surviving in long distance running

5) Rest days can be important as training days. Avoid getting run down and injured by reducing your training volume every 3-4 weeks to allow your body to adapt.

 

If you are one of these inspirational people that loves the idea of running for hours on end through beautiful scenery and endless trails, come in for a chat about how to take the next step.

Contact us now – Physio in Glenelg

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